The Little Railroad That Could, The South Shore

South Shore station at Tremont, Indiana. Gateway to the Indiana Dunes State Park, 1930. This station served many years as the stop for the Indiana Dunes.

 

 

 

 

CSS&SB Lake Shore station which went on line in 1927. It is often informally called the Pines station, but the Town of Pines grew up around the station,  The Frederick H Bartlett Realty Company purchased, in May 1927,  most of the land west of the Indiana State Prison in Michigan City to the Indiana Dunes State Park, about 5 1/2 miles of Lake Michigan shore line, 3, 600 acres total. Most of the land was in Porter County, but a small portion was in La Porte County. It was such a huge project, they originally platted only the eastern half and called it Bartlett's Lake Shore Development when they stated to market the land sales. Central Avenue was the main north/south street of the unit. Bartlett built the station, of course in cooperation with the South Shore. The station was based on a design by Arthur U. Gerber, architect of the nine Spanish style stations on the new 1925 Skokie Valley route of the Chicago, North Shore and Milwaukee, also owned by the Samuel Insull utilitity empire. The Lake Shore development lots were sold out in 1927 and 1928. Bartlett only sold land, not structures. The remaining western portion was platted and offered for sale in 1929.  The legal description of the second half is Bartlett's Beverly Shores Development. Apparently it was decided at that time to call the entire project Beverly Shores. Beverly Bartlett was the daughter of Robert Bartlett, brother of Frederick H Bartlett. The family's story is that she was a sickly nine year old at the time, possibly with the expectation of a short life span.  However, She lived to be 85 when she died in 2005. The photo has what appears to have somewhat make-shift signs, a tile missing and little foliage, That would date the picture to after the October 1929 stock market crash.   The current Beverly Shores station, a mirror image of the Lake Shore station, went on line in July 1929. tThe Lake Shore station was demolished. It probably was in the 1970s when other railroads had purchased the South Shore for its freight operations. Tthe Lake Shore station just disappeared one day. Full service at both stations was discontinued in 1963 and the station managers, who also lived there, were reassigned. Bev Shores had only one agent for all those years, Nellie Warren and her husband, also a railroad employee, stayed there until he retired and they moved to central Illinois. For awhile South Shore employees were able to live in the station residence to keep vandals out and to maintain the structure.

  

Left: Action on the South Shore at Beverly Shores on a snowy day. Right: Making a stop at Hudson Lake.

 

  

Left: Special train east bound, heading towards coach yard. This train could be a Notre Dame football special. Picture from "South Shore, The Last Interburban", courtsey of Jim Wiseman. Right: Single westbound train loading passengers at downtown station, circa 1959. Picture from "South Shore, The Last Interburban", courtsey of Jim Wiseman.

  

Left: South Shore cars line up on LaSalle Street. Coach yard is shown in the background. Note street car tracks alongside the South Shore tracks. Today the Pointe Apartments are located on the site of the Coach Yard. Picture from "South Shore, The Last Interburban", courtsey of Jim Wiseman. Right: South Shore train meeting Golden Arrow Coach Lines at the downtown South Bend station. Bus service was one time available from the station. Picture from "South Shore, The Last Interburban", courtsey of Jim Wiseman.

  

Left: Westbound South Shore train loading passengers. Looking east towards the St. Joseph River. Courtsey of Jim Wiseman. Right: Another picture of the Coach Yard. Westbound train leaving the yard, enroute to the station. Courtsey of Jim Wiseman.

  

Left: South Bend street running. June 1970, west side of South Bend. Orange Street at a unused New York Central spur. Picture courtsey of "North Shore, South Shore", by Russ Porter. Right: More South Bend street running. This picture is taken on the west side of the city, before service to downtown via LaSalle Street was officially terminated. Picture courtsey of "North Shore, South Shore", by Russ Porter.

  

Left: Almost finished with the run. Eastbound train traveling the last few yards of itís trip from Chicago to South Bend in June of 1970. Car #11 was originally built in 1926. Picture courtsey of "North Shore, South Shore", by Russ Porter. Right" Combine #104 has just left the coach yard. Traveling westbound towards the station at LaSalle and Main. Picture courtsey of "North Shore, South Shore", by Russ Porter.

  

Left: Combine #103 has just pulled away from the station, heading westbound to Chicago in June 1970. Picture courtsey of "North Shore, South Shore", by Russ Porter. Right: Workman is inspecting the undercarriage of #100 and #108 in the Coach Yard east of the St. Joseph River. Picture courtsey of "North Shore, South Shore", by Russ Porter.

  

NEW 08-16-2011 Left: Two car sit at the Coach Yard in downtown South Bend. Right: Cleaning the windows on car 101. South Bend, Indiana.

  

Left: Coach #104 moves out of the Coach Yard, June 1970. It will pick up its first passengers at the LaSalle Street station a few blocks west. Picture courtsey of "North Shore, South Shore", by Russ Porter. Right: Freight motor #706 working the Bendix siding sometime in September 1965. Dennis Schmidt photo, courtsey of George Elwood.

  

Left: South Shore Motor # 107 turning on to Orange Street, August 19, 1958. This eastbound train is headed downtown. Later the line would be abandoned and the east end of the line is where the South Bend Amtrak station is today. East of Bendix on Washington Street. Right: Motor #111 has just made a station stop, July 19, 1951 and is heading east toward the Coach Yard. It is about to cross the St. Joseph River. Both photos taken by Dennis Schmidt, courtsey of George Elwood.

  

Left: South Shore Motor # 17 making the trip downtown. Picture is around LaPorte Street, where the tracks went from Orange to LaSalle Street. Right: Another shot of the neighborhood running. This time #107 is making the trip. Both photos Ron Stuckey/ John Fuller photos.

Another great photo by Dennis Schmidt. Flying the flag of a "special" this picture was taken west town as the train passes Bendix. Could be a "football special" with Notre Dame fans ready to cheer on the Fighting Irish. Dennis Schmidt photo.

  

Left: Motor #100 at, I believe, the Coach Yard, east of downtown. Right: Another picture from the Coach Yard, this time of Motor #9. Both photos by Dennis Schmidt, courtsey George Elwood.

  

Left: 1936 at the Coach Yard, east of downtown. Motor Unit #104 is getting ready to, or finishing a run from, Chicago. Harry Zillmer photo. Right: Freight locomotive #706 bringing a local freight into South Bend in 1962. I believe the location of this photo was west of Bendix. John Strombeck photo.

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